An analysis of alfred hitchcocks the birds

Naturally, I have tried to focus the data intelligently and in an informed way, drawing on my knowledge of the director and his films, and of Hitchcock scholarship and criticism. Three appendices round out the account. Recently, I noticed a specific indebtedness of The Birds to F. A Song of Two Humanssomething that my account had not touched on.

An analysis of alfred hitchcocks the birds

Hitchcock weaves visual design, cinematography, editing, and sound design together to create an abstract horror film about survival against a sudden danger that appeared out of everyday life -- a theme with which everyone can identify.

An analysis of alfred hitchcocks the birds

Hitchcock utilizes camera narration throughout The Birds to illustrate how birds impact what is being said, as well as how it is being said.

Birds control the actions of the characters from the very beginning. Soon, the ambient sounds of birds pick up the soundscape and Melanie looks to the sky and sees a number of birds in flight. Throughout the entirety of The Birds, there is no score -- only the chirping madness of the looming and growing threat, the significance of which is foreshadowed by this shot.

The strange movement patterns of the birds outside are discussed, and, not surprisingly, Melanie is there to pick up a rare bird. All around her, birds are caged and confined, giving the illusion they are under the control of humans.

On a brightly-lit, calm day, Melanie sits on a bench outside a school with a playground jungle gym behind her. A few crows land, unbeknownst to her, on the jungle gym. Compared to Melanie, dressed in a fine green suit with her perfect hair and radiant looks, the ominous black birds quickly stand out and develop a presence as the dominant power in the frame.

Hitchcock cuts away from the birds, to Melanie rooting through her purse, smoking cigarettes, and close-ups of her face, showing her growing impatience, each time cutting back to a wider shot that reveals more birds have joined the perch.

Finally, she spots one flying overhead and her eyes the camera follows it to the playground at her back, revealing it to be swarmed with crows. All the while, the children in the schoolhouse sing a cheerful nonsense song to heighten the absurdity of the scene.

A beautiful, ecclesiastic and extreme example of this camera angle comes after the gas station explosion, as an aerial shot watches the fire unfold as the birds swoop in from off-camera, as if to celebrate the victory of their work. Hitchcock plays with the element of space regularly in The Birds.

What starts off as a film with vast, open shots of San Francisco, lakefront towns and wide areas ends up a claustrophobic fight for life. Hitchcock proves in each of his films that he is a master of control in framing and angles to achieve the emotional effects he wants at any given moment, and The Birds is a chief example of that in action.The Birds study guide contains a biography of Alfred Hitchcock, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

About The Birds The Birds Summary. The Complete Alfred Hitchcock. though the theatrical element brokers a sophisticated analysis of role-playing that encompasses gender and class.

The Birds. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. With Rod Taylor, Tippi Hedren, Jessica Tandy US .

Fun Facts about the Movie

Garden birds turning against mankind -- even though the plot seems banal, it has become terrifying in the hands of Hitchcock. Tippi Hedren played the blonde heroine of "The Birds." The story starts with the lawyer Mitch Brenner (Rod Taylor), who meets a rich girl Melanie Daniels (Tippi) in a pet shop and treats her like a shop assistant.

Garden birds turning against mankind -- even though the plot seems banal, it has become terrifying in the hands of Hitchcock. Tippi Hedren played the blonde heroine of "The Birds." The story starts with the lawyer Mitch Brenner (Rod Taylor), who meets a rich girl Melanie Daniels (Tippi) in a pet shop and treats her like a shop assistant.

Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds () starts in a pet store, displaying all types of animals in cages.

An analysis of alfred hitchcocks the birds

Mitch (Rod Taylor) is looking for lovebirds for his young sister (Veronica Cartwright). Does the film’s early mention of these birds suggest that people can be imprisoned by the exclusive nature.

Aug 08,  · If the birds represent an irresistible natural force, Daphne du Maurier cleverly suggests this by allying her birds with the ebb and flow of the tides; Hitchcock’s film .

MoMA | Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds